Day 3 in Europa

Bonjour mon amis... today we run around Paris...  ooh la la... they first view in the morning is lovely, non?
Paris Morning Window AVAILABLE HERE
now that we are out and about in the City...  our first stop... Luxembourg Jardins...

 oui oui oui... Fifi has painted the pond avec sailboats...
Painting AVAILABLE HERE

here is another view in the garden... Fifi has not painted this YET... but it does inspire one to paint!
strolling in this area of Paris... we find Église Saint-Sulpice, Paris...
The present church is the second building on the site, erected over a Romanesque church originally constructed during the 13th century. Additions were made over the centuries, up to 1631. The new building was founded in 1646 by parish priest Jean-Jacques Olier (1608–1657) who had established the Society of Saint-Sulpice, a clerical congregation, and a seminary attached to the church. 

Work continued for about 140 years: The church was mostly completed in 1732; the chancel is the work of Christophe Gamard, Louis Le Vau and Daniel Gittard, but the work was completed by Gilles-Marie Oppenord, a student of François Mansart, in 1714-1745. 

The façade is an unorthodox essay of 1732 by Giovanni Niccolò Servandoni in which a double Ionic colonnade, Ionic order over Roman Doric with loggias behind them unify the bases of the corner towers with the façade; this fully classicising statement was made at the height of the Rococo. Its revolutionary character was recognised two decades later by the architect and teacher Jacques-François Blondel, who illustrated the elevation of the façade in his Architecture française, remarking, "The entire merit of this building lies in the architecture itself... and its greatness of scale, which opens a practically new road for our French architects." It has been modified by Jean Chalgrin and others. Large arched windows fill the vast interior with natural light. The result is a simple two-storey west front with three tiers of elegant columns. The overall harmony of the building is, some say, only marred by the mismatched two towers; one, to the neoclassical design of Jean François Chalgrin, was added shortly before the French Revolution but its matching tower was never begun, and the former tower remains. 

At either side of the front door are two enormous shells given to King Francis I by the Venetian Republic. The two shells rest on rock-like bases, sculpted by Jean-Baptiste Pigalle. The pulpit, Saint-Sulpice 

Nineteenth-century redecorations to the interior, after some Revolutionary damage when Saint-Sulpice became a Temple of Victory, include the murals of Eugène Delacroix, that adorn the walls of the side chapel. The most famous of these are Jacob Wrestling with the Angel and Heliodorus Driven from the Temple.Jules Massenet set an act of Manon at fashionable Saint-Sulpice. 

Another point of interest dating from the time of Saint-Sulpice serving as a Temple of Victory is a printed sign over the center door of the main entrance. One can still barely make out the printed words ‘’Le Peuple Francais Reconnoit L’Etre Suprême Et L’Immortalité de L’Âme’’, The people of France recognize the supreme being and the immortality of the soul. Further questions of interest are the fate of the frieze that this must have replaced, the persons responsible for placing this manifesto and the reasons that it has been left in place. 

The Marquis de Sade and Charles Baudelaire were baptized in Saint-Sulpice (1740 and 1821, respectively), and the church also saw the marriage of Victor Hugo to Adèle Foucher (1822). Louise Élisabeth de Bourbon and Louise Élisabeth d'Orléans, grand daughters of Louis XIV and Madame de Montespan are buried in the church. Louise de Lorraine, duchesse de Bouillon was buried here in 1788, wife of Charles Godefroy de La Tour d'Auvergne.
 Information and views inside and outside of Saint-Sulpice Chapel via HERE

all of this walking around... time to find a café for lunch... there are some very famous cafés in this area... these first two Fifi has painted...


and one famous café La Palette... Fifi has yet to paint... BUT stay tuned as she has done a SKETCH of it...
La Pallete is located in the 6th arrondissement of Paris, at the intersection of Rue de Siene and Rue Jacques-Callot. The restaurant is made of two salons, the smaller first one offers the bar and in intimate setting the second larger back room is stylishly decorated with ceramics from the 1930s-40s and contains the dinning tables.

La Pallete is also popular for it large terrace that overlooks the street of Jacques-Callot. The restaurant's façade and interior of the second salon are registered as historic monuments as well.

The bistro is traditionally a gathering place for Fine Arts students, nearby gallery owners and artists. It was also sought after international artists. In fact, La Pallete was frequented by Cézanne, Picasso and Brauqe and later by Ernest Hemingway and Jim Morrison. Among others today's celebrities include Harrison Ford and Julia Roberts.

hmmmm... now where shall we roam... passed the Sorbonne...
and Notre Dame...
across the Seine to Musée Carnavalet...






The Carnavalet Museum in Paris is dedicated to the history of the city. The museum occupies two neighboring mansions: the Hôtel Carnavalet and the former Hôtel Le Peletier de Saint Fargeau. On the advice of Baron Haussmann, the civil servant who transformed Paris in the latter half of the 19th century, the Hôtel Carnavalet was purchased by the Municipal Council of Paris in 1866; it was opened to the public in 1880. By the latter part of the 20th century, the museum was bursting at the seams. The Hôtel Le Peletier de Saint Fargeau was annexed to the Carnavalet and opened to the public in 1989. (via HERE)

oui oui oui... Fifi painted these gardens a couple of times... just EMAIL (contact link top of site) and either of these paintings can be made into a 5" x 7" card for YOU...

sooooo I think that's enough history for the day... perhaps it's time to meet Kris and other amis in Paris for a glass of vin rouge or a café creme or champagne... or a yummy treat at Angelina...
I think this day has been to overwhelming... these treats have caused moi to be sleepy... I will see tomorrow...  our last day in Paris... I think we will SHOP and eat ... à demain...

ENJOY! 

P.S.  If you are looking for MORE travel... pop over to Nantucket via Reading is Fashionable

5 comments:

Elizabeth Eiffel said...

Wonderful photos, sketches (as usual) and touch of historical commentary. There is always something new to learn about magical Paris. Thank you. Best wishes.

Cris, Artist in Oregon said...

I agree with Elizabeth. Everything is lovely & informative here.

Kris said...

Mon Ami,

It appears you are wore out from all of the sightseeing, non? It was a very busy day for you.

Let us sit so that you can rest and we can finally play catch up on all the "gossip" going on in the US! Isn't there always something going on there? Blah, Blah, Blah.

I wish you were staying longer so we could do a little shopping. I know where all the great bargains are and the brocante's are faBulous! Sigh....

Au Revoir mon ami,

Kris

martinealison said...

Une publication vraiment pleine d'intérêt... Tu nous offres des peintures magnifiques à regarder et tu partages avec nous des moments fabuleux grâce à tes nombreuses photos...
Paris est vraiment une belle ville, n'est-ce pas ? Je me réjouis de m'y rendre samedi prochain...
Gros bisous à toi.

French Home Decor said...

Loving your virtual trip!

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